Uncategorized

Canadian’s New Food Guide Moving Away From Meat Consumption – Give it a try with us during Meat Free Week!

Canadian’s New Food Guide Moving Away From Meat Consumption – Give it a try with us during Meat Free Week!

In the past two decades, Canadians have shifted towards a diet which includes more fruits and vegetables, cereal products, and nuts and beans.

With more and more Canadians making the switch, it is no wonder that Health Canada just released its preliminary draft of Canada’s new Food Guide, the first such overhaul of the country’s nutrition policy in ten years. The changes are long overdue, say health care experts, many of whom see the proposal as a step in the right direction.

The preliminary draft highlights include:

• The importance of adding whole foods to your diet, specifically plant-based foods (such as legumes) as a preferred source of protein
• Regular intake of vegetables, fruit, whole grains and protein-rich foods, especially plant-based sources of protein
• A shift away from animal foods by advising that people eat foods with unsaturated fat instead of saturated fat

Even though statistics in the last 3 decades show a steady decline in Canadian meat consumption, there are still many meat lovers that remain skeptical about making the switch despite the World Health Organization’s classification of red meat – including, beef, veal, pork, lamb, mutton, horse, and goat – as “probably carcinogenic to humans”.
WHO found an even stronger link between processed meat – such as salami and hotdogs, and bowel cancer.

Studies conducted by the World Cancer Research Fund show bowel cancer risk increases by 17% per 100g of red meat consumed per day and that bowel cancer risk increases by 18% per 50g of processed meat consumed per day.

• ¼ cooked hamburger = 80g
• 8 oz steak = 170g
• Spaghetti Bolognese sauce = 100g
• 1 large sausage = 40g processed meat
• 3 slices of ham = 70g processed meat

Read more about how you can reduce your bowel cancer risk.

Try Going Meatless For a Week With Us!

People around the world will be going meatless next week including all of us at Colorectal Cancer Canada for Meat Free Week (18th-24th September 2017). This new campaign challenges participants to give up meat for seven days and raise funds for a great cause.

Going meat free for one week creates a great opportunity to start thinking about how much meat you eat and the impact eating too much meat can have.

Everyone is invited to take the Meat Free Week challenge and discover how easy it is to make little changes that can create a big difference. Challenge yourself, your family, your friends and colleagues to give up meat for seven days.

Sign up for Meat Free Week and raise funds for a great cause!

Not able to participate, but still want to help make real change happen? Make a donation today.

If you’re already living meat free, there are still plenty of ways you can get involved in Meat Free Week.

+ Meat Free Week: Live well. Eat well. Be well.

• Adopt a physically active lifestyle.
• Consume a healthy diet with an emphasis on plant-based foods.
• Maintain a healthy body weight.

Are you following our healthy our foods that fight cancer program?
Once you’ve made it through Meat Free Week, this is a great on-going support program that can help you eat better and live healthier.

Check us out today via our website or facebook page!

About Foods That Fight Cancer

Who Are We?

We are believers of FOOD.

We want to empower Canadians to take charge & take over their health!

So Welcome fellow food enthusiast! Learn about foods here, find your favorites recipes, invite your friends & family, and TAKE OVER your kitchen & your health!

References:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/21-020-x/2009001/part-partie1-eng.htm
https://www.cantechletter.com/2017/07/look-meat-eaters-canadas-new-food-guide-will-turn-vegetarian/

Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Information Guide

Endangered Butts Come in All Shapes, Sizes and Ages!

Endangered Butts Come in All Shapes, Sizes and Ages!

About Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in cells of the colon or rectum.

1 in 14 men and 1 in 16 women are diagnosed with colorectal cancer each year in Canada. Approximately 25,100 Canadians were diagnosed with CRC in 2015. It is the 2nd deadliest cancer, although the disease is more than 90% curable if detected early. Colorectal cancer is Preventable, Treatable and Beatable!

Colorectal cancer most often touches individuals over the age of 50 and over ninety percent (90%) of patients are over 55 years of age. Ten percent (10%) of new colon cancer patients however are under the age of 50. Individuals with certain risk factors such as a family history of polyps, colon cancer or genetic alterations, have an increased risk of developing colon cancer at a younger age. Sixteen percent (16%) of patients under the age of 40 have been reported to have predisposing factors and twenty-three percent (23%) had a family history of the disease.

Table 1: Number of new cases of colorectal cancer diagnoses in 2015 by age group in Canada

chart 1 EN

About the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada (“CCAC”)

The CCAC is dedicated to colorectal cancer awareness and education, supporting patients and their families, and advocating on their behalf. The CCAC raises awareness and provides important and practical information to colorectal cancer patients, young and old. Together with the Never Too Young (“N2Y”) coalition, we provide support and information to young patients in Canada who have experienced early onset of the disease.

About N2Y

The Never Too Young Coalition is united to take action on young onset of colorectal cancer through action, education, and research. The Coalition includes medical professionals, patient advocacy organizations, cancer survivors and caregivers working to educate the public about this growing issue and to reduce the number of late stage young-onset colorectal cancer cases.

As the leading national colorectal cancer patient advocacy organization in Canada, we’re dedicated to bringing together the brightest minds to increase screening and to promote equal and timely access to effective treatments to improve patient outcomes.

Symptoms of CRC

• Blood in the stool
• Narrower-than-normal stools
• Prolonged diarrhea or constipation
• Feeling that the bowel does not completely feel empty
• Abdominal pain or discomfort
• Loss of appetite, unexplained weight loss
• Constant fatigue, anemia
• Nausea, vomiting

Risk Factors

Family History of Colon Cancer or polyps

About 10% of the population has a first degree relative with colon or rectal cancer.

First and second degree relatives (children, siblings, grandchildren, nieces, nephews) of a person with a history of colon cancer are more likely to develop CRC themselves, especially if their relative had the cancer at a young age. If several close relatives have a history of colon cancer, there is an increased risk. In view of this increased risk, both the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) recommend screening as of the age 40 for these high-risk individuals or ten years earlier than the youngest age of colorectal cancer diagnosis for any affected relative.

Genetic Alterations

Changes in certain genes increase your risk of colon cancer.

Hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC or Lynch Syndrome) is the most common type of inherited colon cancer, accounting for about 2% of all colon cancer cases. It is caused by changes in a HNPCC gene. If not closely monitored, most individuals with this altered gene will develop colon cancer, with the average age at diagnosis being 42-45, and 35-40% being diagnosed before the age of 40. General screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 1-2 years, beginning between the ages of 20-25, or five years younger than the earliest age at diagnosis in the family, whichever is sooner.

Much rarer is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) an inherited condition in which hundreds of polyps form in the colon and rectum. It is caused by a change in a specific gene called APC. Unless FAP is treated, it usually leads to colon cancer by age 40. FAP accounts for less than 1% of all colon cancer cases.

Family members of individuals who have HNPCC or FAP can have genetic testing to check for specific genetic changes. For those who have changes in their genes, healthcare providers may suggest ways to try to reduce the risk of colon cancer or to improve the detection of this disease. For adults with FAP, the doctor may recommend the removal of all or part of the colon and rectum.

Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn’s Disease

A person who has had a condition that causes inflammation of the colon (such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease) for many years is at an increased risk of developing colon cancer. Patients should therefore be screened regularly.

Other Factors

Other factors contributing to young-onset of colon cancer have not been definitely identified, but we do know they occur with an increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Factors that may increase your risk of colon cancer include:

• There is approximately two times higher risk of developing colorectal cancer later life if you are overweight or obese during adolescence.
• A diet high in red or processed meat and low in fiber, vegetables and fruits.
• Inactivity: 12-14% of colorectal cancer could be attributed to lack in physical activity
• Smoking
• Increase consumption of alcohol
• Racial and ethnic background

Statistics and Data

• Colon cancer incidence and mortality rates are increasing in the young-onset population while decreasing in those over 50.
• About 30% of young-onset colorectal cancer cases develop in those with a family history of the disease or genetic disposition.
• Young-onset rectal cancer incidence has increased at nearly twice the rate of young-onset colon cancer.
• About 72% of cases of colorectal cancer in young people arise in the colon and about 28% in the rectum.
• Younger adults were more likely than older adults to be diagnosed with late-stage cancers.
• Rates have been increasing in all younger age groups with the highest increases for the 15-29 years old, followed by the 30-39 years old and then 40-49.
• The increase is more rapid in males compared to females.
• Diabetes has been associated with up to a 38% increase in colon cancer risk and 20% increase in rectal cancer risk.

Prevention

Research shows that a high fat diet is a risk factor for colon cancer. Some studies have also suggested that a diet high in fiber and a lifestyle that includes moderate exercise are helpful in preventing the disease. Be aware of symptoms and getting recommended screenings are key factors in prevention of the disease.
After speaking to family members and gathering your family health history, speak to your primary care provider about ways to improve your diet and lifestyle to prevent colon cancer and about scheduling preventative screenings when necessary. A healthy lifestyle and healthy body weight is important for prevention of all cancers.

Screening

• Men and women at average risk, screening should be done at least every two years starting at fifty years old with either FOBT (fecal occult blood test) or FIT (fecal immunochemical test). Positive FOBT or FIT tests should be followed up with a colonoscopy.
• Screening has the potential to prevent colorectal cancer because polyps found in the colon (precursors to cancer) can be removed during a colonoscopy screening. Furthermore, being screened at the recommended frequency increases the likelihood that when colorectal cancer is present, it will be detected at an earlier stage and is more likely to be treatable and curable.

Table 2: Canadian Colon Screening Guidelines

chart 2 EN

Genetics

Tests have been developed that look at the activity of many different genes in colon cancer tumors. These tests can be used to help predict which patients have a higher risk that the cancer will spread.

Lynch Syndrome (see also previous section of genetic alterations)

Lynch syndrome is a mutation of a gene that is responsible for fixing errors in your DNA. Lynch Syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), is an hereditary disorder caused by a genetic mutation in which affected individuals have a higher than normal chance of developing colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other types of aggressive cancers, often at a young age. To prevent colorectal cancer, people with Lynch Syndrome should undergo a colonoscopy every 1-2 years, starting in their twenties. Doing this will reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by 77%.

People with Lynch syndrome have a mutation of the MMR gene, which means their bodies are less able to fix errors in the DNA. Consequently, a person with Lynch syndrome is more likely to get certain types of cancer. Lynch syndrome increases the risk of getting colorectal cancer by 80 percent and endometrial cancer by 60 percent. Lynch syndrome may also lead to other cancers, such as small bowel and stomach cancer. Lynch syndrome accounts for 2- 4% of all colorectal cancer cases.

Treatments and Effects

1. Newer surgery techniques:

Surgeons are continuing to improve their techniques for operating on colorectal cancers. They now have a better understanding of what makes colorectal surgery more likely to be successful.
Laparoscopic surgery is done through several small incisions in the abdomen instead of one large one, and it’s becoming more widely used for some colon cancers. This approach usually allows patients to recover faster, with less pain after the operation. Laparoscopic surgery is also being studied for treating some rectal cancers, but more research is needed to see if it as effective as standard surgery.

With robotic surgery, a surgeon sits at a control panel and operates very precise robotic arms to perform the surgery. This type of surgery is also being studied.

2. Chemotherapy:

Different approaches are being tested in clinical trials, including:

• Five most common chemotherapy drugs: 5-fluorouracil (Adrucil, 5-fu), capecitabine (Xeloda), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), and irinotecan (Camptosar).
• Combination of drugs known to be active against colorectal cancer, such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin, improve their effectiveness.
• Combination of chemotherapy with radiation therapy, targeted therapies, and/or immunotherapy.

3. Targeted therapy:

Several targeted therapies are already used to treat colorectal cancer, including bevacizumab (Avastin), cetuximab (Erbitux), and panitumumab (Vectibix). Doctors continue to study the best way to give these drugs to make them more effective.

Targeted therapies are currently used to treat advanced cancers, but newer studies are trying to determine if using them with chemotherapy in earlier stage cancers as part of adjuvant therapy may further reduce the risk of recurrence.

4. Immunotherapy:

Researchers are studying several vaccines to try to treat colorectal cancer or prevent it from coming back after treatment. Unlike vaccines that prevent infectious diseases, these vaccines are meant to boost the patient’s immune reaction to fight colorectal cancer more effectively.

Because cancer treatments may damage healthy cells and tissues, side effects are common. Side effects depend mainly on the type and extent of the treatment. While many effects may be the same, there are some unique challenges those diagnosed and going through treatment under age 50 may encounter, including:

• Relationships with family and friends
• Impact on young children
• Dating issues
• Infertility issues
• Intimacy issues
• Career/workplace issues
• Financial issues
• Psychological issues

References

1. Ahnen et al. (2014). The Increasing Incidence of Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer: A Call to Action. Mayo Clinic.
2. McKay et al. (2014). Does young age influence the prognosis of colorectal cancer: a population-based analysis. World of Surgical Oncology.
3. Patel, P. & De, P. (2016). Trends in colorectal cancer incidence and related lifestyle risk factors in 15-49-year-olds in Canada, 1969-2010. Cancer Epidemiology.
4. Stigliano et al. (2014). Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer: A Sporadic or Inherited Disease? World Journal of Gastroenterology.
5. Alive And Kickn. (2015). http://aliveandkickn.org/
6. Canadian Cancer Society. (2016). http://www.cancer.ca/en/?region=on
7. Colon Cancer Alliance. (2016). http://www.ccalliance.org/
8. Colon Cancer Coalition. (2016). http://coloncancercoalition.org/
9. Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada. (2016). http://www.colorectal-cancer.ca/en/
10. Fight Colorectal Cancer. (2016). http://fightcolorectalcancer.org/
11. Present and Future Directions in Research. (2013). Michael’s Mission. http://www.michaelsmission.org/
12. Stop Colon Cancer Now. (2014). http://stopcoloncancernow.com/
13. What you need to know about your colon. (2013). Colon Cancer Challenge Foundation. http://www.coloncancerchallenge.org/

Werner Muehlemann – Survivor and Advocate for Change!

Werner Muehlemann

“At 28 years-old, I went to see my doctor about a problem I was having. He told me that I had nothing to worry about because I was young and in good shape. Following a few tests, I was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. In that moment, I saw my life flash before my eyes – my career and dreams of getting married and starting a family vanishing.

The CCAC helped me acquire all the information that I needed to understand my treatments to follow in the months ahead and ultimately beat colorectal cancer. The CCAC also helped my family get the information they needed to support me in my long journey. Today, nine years later, I have three children with the same woman and I survived this cancer. And for the first a few years ago, I was able to complete my marathon.

Werner now serves on the Board of Directors at the CCAC and advocates on behalf of   all the work that we do in order to beat this terrible disease.

Werner now serves on the Board of Directors at the CCAC and advocates on behalf of all the work that we do in order to beat this terrible disease.

My dream for the future is that colorectal cancer screening becomes as routine as going to the dentist.”

In the spirit of Young Survivors Week, the CCAC has compiled a series of survivor stories to offer hope, instill courage and inspire change. We continue to share new stories every day. If you would like to share yours, please send it to isabellan@colorectal-cancer.ca.

RECENT STUDIES SHOW COLORECTAL CANCER DOES NOT AGE DISCRIMINATE. YOU’RE NEVER TOO YOUNG TO BE AWARE & PREPARED

RECENT STUDIES SHOW COLORECTAL CANCER DOES NOT AGE DISCRIMINATE. YOU’RE NEVER TOO YOUNG TO BE AWARE & PREPARED

butt pic Reports from across Canada show doctors are observing a new trend in colorectal cancer that cannot be ignored nor explained – a “rapid increase” in the number of patients being diagnosed under age 50.
A new study, led by doctors from the University of Toronto, looked at Canadian Cancer Registry data from 1997 to 2010 and found that incidences of colorectal cancer rose by:

• 0.8 per cent per year for people in their 40s,
• 2.4 per cent per year for people in their 30s, and
• 6.7 per cent per year for those between ages 15 and 29.

Thankfully awareness campaigns and advocacy to increase the accessibility of colorectal cancer screening has been responsible for declining rates in people over 50 in the last few years. However, these new reports are a reminder that there is still so much more work to be done.

This year, the CCAC was proud to join forces with the Never Too Young Coalition (N2Y), a branch of Colon Cancer Alliance. Their mandate, like ours, is to raise awareness about the disease, preventative screening and to provide much needed information to the younger Canadian population about the signs and symptoms of the disease, particularly how to avoid a misdiagnosis, which according to studies is occurring more frequently due to the age shift.

Although it is evident that more research is needed to determine the cause of this age shift, we are encouraging doctors and patients to become more vigilant and conscience as the signs and symptoms of colon cancer can often be mistaken for other, less serious issues. The longer it takes for a diagnosis the harder it is treat, which is key in survival.

Risk factors for colon cancer

The fact that incidence is rising only among younger people suggests “lifestyle” factors are at play, but the evidence of this is not concrete. Pay attention to your body and if you have any of these risk factors, talk to your doctor – take charge of your health!

• Family history of colon cancer or polyps: First and second degree relatives of a person with a history of colon cancer and polyps are more likely to develop this disease, especially if the relative had the cancer at a young age
• Genetic Alterations: Changes in certain genes increase your risk of colon cancer. Those with syndromes like hereditary nonployposis colon cancer (HNPCC or Lynch Syndrome) or Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) should be screened earlier than 50
• Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s disease
• African Americans should be screened starting at age 45, or sooner if you have other risk factors or symptoms
• Lifestyle factors, like eating processed and red meats, a lack of dietary fibre, a lack of physical exercise, obesity, alcohol, smoking, diabetes and genetics

June 5-11 will mark the second annual “Young Survivors Week,” connecting with patients, survivors, and caregivers to create buzz around young onset colon cancer. Join us and N2Y as we spread the word via social media by sharing stories and information to help others understand that IT can happen to anyone.

Get Into The Active Groove: The Colorectal Cancer Association Hosts It’s Third Annual Sortez! Bougez! This June

Physical activity provides many health benefits, such as getting or maintaining a healthy body weight and reducing the risk of colon cancer and many other diseases.

That’s why on Saturday, June 20th, The Colorectal Cancer Association (CCAC), The Dairy Farmers of Canada and U.N.I.Training, have joined forces to host the third Annual Sortez! Bougez!/ Get Out There and Move fitness event to promote the importance of physical activity.

Whether you’re a fitness guru or a beginner looking for a place to kick start your new past time, this event on the Lachine Canal is the place to be. Rain or shine, participants will partake in the CCAC’s endurance, adaptable to all fitness levels.

The challenge, should you choose to accept it, is to take part in four 45 minutes classes showcasing different forms of group training; Zumba, Kickboxing, Boot Camp and Yoga.

This taster pack of physical activity costs participants $30 to register and includes snacks, lunch and beverages throughout the day, which runs from 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM. Any additional sponsorship or doantions will receive a tax receipt. Proceeds will be donated to the CCAC.

“The importance of physical activity cannot be emphasized enough. In today’s society that is moving towards a more sedentary lifestyle, there is a greater need than ever to increase one’s daily activity level to maintain optimal health and prevent future illness. This event is designed to remind people of that and to introduce them to a new way of thinking. We hope to see you there!” Said Barry Stein, CCAC president.

For more information or to join the fitness revolution, visit www.sortezbougez.ca.

FDA fast-tracks Taiho Oncology’s TAS-102 for Colorectal Cancer

Otsuka

The US Food and Drug Administration has granted Fast Track designation for TAS-102 (trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride), an oral combination anticancer drug under investigation by Taiho Oncology, a unit of Japanese drugmaker Otsuka (TYO: 4768).

The New Drug Application is for the treatment of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and the company has initiated a rolling NDA submission to the FDA. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 136,830 people will be diagnosed with, and 50,310 people will die from, cancer of the colon or rectum during 2014 in the USA.

“We are pleased that TAS-102 has been granted Fast Track designation,” said Fabio Benedetti, senior vice president and chief medical officer at Taiho Oncology, adding: “Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, whose disease has progressed after treatment with standard therapies, have limited treatment options to manage their disease. We have initiated our rolling NDA submission to the FDA, and are committed to submitting the rest of the filing as efficiently as possible.”

The results from the Phase III RECOURSE trial of TAS-102 in 800 patients affected with mCRC, whose disease had progressed after or who were intolerant to standard therapies, are the foundation for Taiho Oncology’s NDA submission to the FDA.

Taiho Oncology, Otsuka, TAS-102, Fast-track designation, USA, FDA, Colorectal cancer, NDA

 

Calcium, Vitamin D, Dairy Products, and Mortality Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors

Calcium, Vitamin D, Dairy Products, and Mortality Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors: The Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

Yang B, McCullough ML, Gapstur SM, et al

J Clin Oncol. 2014;32:2335-2343

Study Summary

Diet and lifestyle changes may play an important role in cancer pathogenesis. Yang and fellow American Cancer Society investigators analyzed the role of calcium, vitamin D, and dairy product intake before and after diagnosis of nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. The study population comprised 2284 participants in a prospective cohort study.

In multivariate analysis, post-diagnosis total calcium intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR] for those in the highest relative to the lowest quartiles, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-0.98; Ptrend = .02). An inverse association with all-cause mortality was also observed for postdiagnosis milk intake (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55-0.94; Ptrend = .02), but not for vitamin D intake. Prediagnosis intakes were not associated with mortality.

Viewpoint

Diet and modifiable lifestyle factors are important issues for survivors of localized colorectal cancer. Unfortunately, randomized trials in this setting are difficult to conduct, require prolonged follow-up, and may not be able to control for all lifestyle factors. Therefore, data from well-conducted prospective cohort studies may be good enough to make recommendations to patients.

This study suggests that increased milk and calcium intake is associated with improved outcomes. Limitations include the primarily white study population with known higher rates of lactase persistence; in addition, the lack of association with vitamin D intake is inconsistent with prior reports.[1] Increased milk and calcium intake, along with reduced red meat intake and regular exercise, can be discussion points for survivors of colorectal cancer interested in modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

Abstract

Avec de la viande rouge, mangez des pommes de terre froides

 

Avec de la viande rouge, mangez des pommes de terre froides 

La consommation (excessive) de viande rouge est associée à un risque accru de cancer du côlon. Il s’avère qu’une série d’aliments peuvent atténuer cet effet.

Le premier message, c’est qu’il est important de limiter ses apports en viande rouge : 300 g par semaine, et en tout cas pas plus de 500 g, si possible en choisissant des coupes maigres et en retirant le gras avant la cuisson. Et donc, expliquent ces chercheurs de l’université Flinders (Australie), il est utile d’accompagner sa viande d’aliments riches en fibres (cela on le savait) et en amidon résistant.

Cet amidon présente la particularité de ne pas être (pré)digéré par l’estomac et par l’intestin grêle et dès lors d’arriver intact dans le gros intestin, où il va produire des substances bénéfiques appelées acides gras à chaîne courte. L’équipe australienne a conduit une expérience sur des volontaires adultes et a pu démontrer que l’amidon résistant contrait l’apparition de molécules néfastes liées à la viande rouge.

Comme sources alimentaires, on mentionnera les légumineuses (en particulier les haricots, les pois chiches et les lentilles), les grains entiers (blé, maïs, riz…), les bananes assez vertes, ainsi encore que les pommes de terre cuites et refroidies. Cela ne signifie évidemment pas que la viande rouge peut alors être consommée à volonté, mais que des apports réguliers d’aliments riches en amidon résistant – et en fibres, encore trop négligées ! – peuvent avoir un effet protecteur très intéressant contre le cancer colorectal.

publié le : 21-10-2014

Source: Cancer Prevention Research (http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org)

Boehringer Ingelheim Global Phase III study in patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC).

Tue, 10/21/2014 – 8:30am

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, with nearly 1.4 million new cases diagnosed each year. Prognosis is very poor for patients with mCRC with fewer than 10% surviving for more than five years after diagnosis.

LUME-COLON 1 [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02149108] is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nintedanib plus best supportive care (BSC), versus placebo plus BSC, after previous treatment with standard chemotherapy and biological agents. This new study will build on previous Phase I/II studies evaluating nintedanib in mCRC.
Nintedanib is an investigational compound in mCRC; its safety and efficacy have not been established.

“Based on previous clinical studies with nintedanib, BI will initiate the LUME-COLON 1 study to evaluate this compound as a potential treatment option for patients with refractory colorectal cancer,” said Berthold Greifenberg, M.D., vice president, Clinical Development and Medical Affairs, Oncology, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

“Patient needs are the driving force behind BI’s innovation in cancer research, and the initiation of this global Phase III study represents our commitment to addressing a critical need in the colorectal cancer community.”

L’analyse de sang, piste d’avenir pour le soin

SOPHIE GUIRAUD

Cancer : l’analyse de sang, piste d’avenir pour le soin 
Marc Ychou et Alain Thierry, partenaires de la start-up DiaDx.

CHRISTOPHE FORTIN

Alain Thierry a mis au point une “biopsie liquide” présentée jeudi au congrès international d’oncologie digestive à Montpellier.

Il y a six mois, il a eu les honneurs de la revue scientifique Nature Medicine : pour la première fois, un chercheur montrait l’intérêt d’une “biopsie liquide”, qui consiste, depuis un échantillon sanguin, à rechercher des mutations génétiques dans l’ADN pour traiter les cancers colorectaux. Depuis, l’idée a fait du chemin. Ce jeudi, Alain Thierry, chercheur Inserm à l’institut de recherche en cancérologie de Montpellier (IRCM), a présenté ses travaux à la conférence internationale d’oncologie digestive organisée jusqu’à samedi au Corum. Le concept est aujourd’hui expérimenté dans une quinzaine de centres en France. Une start-up a été créée. Un développement est envisageable à l’horizon 2016.

Une prise de sang plutôt qu’une biopsie

Explications : “Toutes les cellules relarguent de l’ADN dans le sang, l’ADN circulant”, indique le chercheur. Que se passe-t-il chez un malade ? “Quand une personne a un cancer, l’ADN circulant est relargué en plus grande quantité. C’est un biomarqueur intéressant pour analyser la tumeur. Le test sanguin que nous avons mis au point évite de faire une biopsie pour accéder à des informations capitales dans les choix thérapeutiques à venir. On recherche des mutations génétiques qui, si elles sont présentes, rendent inefficaces un traitement par anticorps”, décrypte Alain Thierry.

Pionnier allemand

L’Allemand Klaus Pantel (CHU de Hambourg), pionnier et expert de l’étude des cellules tumorales circulantes, sera à Montpellier du 14 au 16 octobre 2014 pour une formation de la communauté scientifique et médicale. Il donnera un cours du master international “Cancer Biology” coordonné par le docteur Catherine Panabières, du CHU de Montpellier. Les deux établissements (CHU de Montpellier et de Hambourg) sont associés sur un projet européen de détection des cellules tumorales circulantes dans le cancer de la prostate.

18 000 décès du cancer colorectal par an en France

La méthode a plusieurs avantages : “On gagne du temps, avec un résultat obtenu en 48 h plutôt qu’en un mois. Le test est moins invasif, plus précis, moins coûteux.” L’histoire est loin d’être terminée : “On est dans un programme de recherche clinique”, précise le professeur Marc Ychou, de l’ICM (Institut régional du cancer de Montpellier), associé à Alain Thierry au sein de la start-up DiaDx. Le potentiel est conséquent. Le cancer colorectal touche 40 000 nouveaux patients par an en France, pour 18 000 décès. Enfin, précisent le chercheur et le médecin, “le test est adaptable aux cancers solides comme le sein et le poumon”.