Archive for September, 2016

Launch of the Get Personal Campaign on World Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Day

Launch of the Get Personal Campaign on World Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Day

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Today is World Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Day. A day dedicated to raise awareness of the most advanced form of colorectal cancer, known as metastatic colorectal cancer; this is when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver or lungs.

Each year there are 1.4 million new cases and 694,000 deaths from colorectal cancer. Many of these deaths are caused because the disease is detected too late. Approximately 20% of people across Europe and the US are diagnosed when the cancer has spread and even more go on to develop metastatic colorectal cancer after having been diagnosed at an earlier stage. Regardless of where you live in the world, people diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer have no more than a 1 in 10 chance of surviving more than five years.

However, with timely access to effective treatment and high quality care, people with metastatic disease can see their survival chances and their quality of life dramatically improve. But for too many patients, access to treatment is dependent on whether they have adequate insurance or if their public health system has approved specific treatments, rather than what their doctors and healthcare providers believe would benefit them most.

To coincide with this important day, Bowel Cancer UK, Bowel Cancer Australia, Colon Cancer Alliance (US), Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada, and Fondation A.R.CA.D. (France), have come together to launch the global Get Personal Campaign to make real change happen for people with advanced colorectal cancer.

Get Personal aims to increase survival rates, improve quality of life and reduce variation in access to best treatment and care for people living with metastatic colorectal cancer around the world.

We are committed to:

• Eliminating variation between and within countries so that everyone, irrespective of where they live, has access to the best treatment and care.
• Putting metastatic colorectal cancer firmly on the agenda of governments, health care providers and key decision-makers.
• Campaigning for further research to address gaps in knowledge and support the development of new, innovative and effective treatments.
• Raising awareness among patients, clinicians and policy-makers of the full range of tests and treatments to be made available.

By campaigning together and learning from each other, we know we can make a difference. Colorectal cancer does not recognise borders, and neither do we
For more information on the campaign and to find out how to take part visit the Get Personal website www.getpersonal.global.

Survivor Story: One Patient Questions & Demands Change – You can too!

Survivor Story: One Patient Questions & Demands Change – You can too!

pic My name is Joan Green. I am 62 years old, married, mother of 3 and I was diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer in 2013. My disease spread to my liver and lungs which necessitated me going on chemotherapy and a targeted therapy called Avastin. I have been responding very well to this combination therapy for quite some time. My quality of life has actually been good and I have managed to lead a relatively normal lifestyle. The majority of tumours have shrunk and I am grateful to be alive especially with the support of the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada through their monthly support and information meetings which are amazing and helpful to us all. I really appreciate these monthly meetings.

I have recently been advised though by my medical oncologist that my liver enzymes are taking a beating because of the toxicity caused from the chemotherapy. The oncologist is, therefore, recommending I change chemotherapy regimen. If I do this, I will no longer be eligible for the avastin which I believe has made a difference in the management of my disease. The provincial plan where I live does not fund avastin therapy in the next line of therapy for me. This is so disappointing for me and for my family who rely entirely on universal health care coverage! I truly believe that Avastin is the drug that is keeping my cancer at bay. I am not certain how to proceed. I know that other countries fund avastin in multiple lines of therapy. Why not in Canada?

Do you want to partake in a movement for change?

action-changes-thingsIf so, the CCAC needs your help! We’ve teamed up with patient advocacy groups from around the world to improve the treatment and care of patients affected by advanced colorectal cancer. Advanced colorectal cancer or metastatic colorectal cancer is when the cancer has spread from the colon or rectum to another part of the body such as the liver or lungs, or anywhere else for that matter. We are carrying out a comprehensive survey on the experiences of advanced colorectal cancer patients to learn about excellent practice and gain an understanding of where improvements need to be made.

Act now and promote change! Take the survey here:

http://confirmit.ssisurveys.com/wix/p65578404.aspx?l=4105

Bracco/EZEM Canada BBQ

It was a festive atmosphere on July 15th at Bracco / EZEM Canada where employees launched their summer vacation with the company’s annual BBQ. In addition to thanking their employees for their accomplishments, Bracco / EZEM Canada took the opportunity to raise awareness of colorectal cancer screening. As a manufacturer of barium products and accessories dedicated to medical imaging of the gastrointestinal tract, employees were able to learn more about the use and importance of their products in these tests. Moreover, this day raised donations for the cause and a $ 1,000 cheque was handed over to the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada. Bravo!