Colorectal cancer has been one of the most extensively studied cancers in relation to physical activity, with more than 50 studies examining this association. Many studies in the United States and around the world have consistently found that adults who increase their physical activity, either in intensity, duration, or frequency, can reduce their risk of developing colon cancer by 30 to 40 percent relative to those who are sedentary regardless of body mass index (BMI), with the greatest risk reduction seen among those who are most active (3–7).
Reference: http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/physical-activity-fact-sheet

11700609_920441568027831_5890909817828579234_o When it comes to exercise options, the sky is the limit and there’s something out there for everyone. A little research, a trial and error period and you’ll find your exercise niche in no time.

The world of fitness is not different than anything else, fads will come and go but here are some of the trends expect to continue and surface in 2016:

1. Obstacle Courses
Race formats like the Spartan Race will continue to be popular – the draw is the challenge in finishing the race. Best suited for those with competitive genes.

2. Trampolines
Mini trampolines or rebounders (fitness world terms) bring the functional fitness craze to new heights. Training on an unstable surface not only works to increase muscle strength and stability but helps improve balance and is definitely a cardio workout.

3. Shorter Workouts – High-intensity interval training (HIIT)
HIIT is a training technique in which you give all-out, one hundred percent effort through quick, intense bursts of exercise, followed by short, sometimes active, recovery periods. This type of training has been shown to have the same benefits as longer workouts as it gets and keeps your heart rate up and burns more fat in less time.

4. Barre Classes
Most barre-based classes use a combination of postures inspired by ballet and other disciplines like yoga and Pilates. The barre is used as a prop to balance while doing exercises that focus on isometric strength training (holding your body still while you contract a specific set of muscles) combined with high reps of small range-of-motion movements.

5. Functional Fitness
Functional fitness exercises simulate activities you might perform in day-to-day life, with an emphasis on core stability. These exercises are fun and can be done at home or at the gym, alone or in groups. Exercise tools, such as fitness balls, kettle bells and weights, are often used in functional fitness workouts.

Trends aside, the most widely available fitness option is walking. It’s low-impact, gentle on joints, and can be done anywhere by anyone. Always work at your own pace. If you want more cardio just speed up your rhythm and don’t be afraid to challenge yourself. You should be able to talk in between breaths while walking. As you progress, you may want to add some light ankle or wrist weights. Comfortable shoes and a bottle of water are a must. If you are a night walker, invest in some reflective gear as well.

Whether you’re a novice or a fitness buff, always remember to start slowly when taking up a new exercise. Jumping in too quickly is a recipe for injury and could set you up for failure and always remember to stretch before and after any workout. Check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program, especially if you haven’t exercised for a long time, have chronic health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes or arthritis, or you have any concerns.

Exercise and physical activity are a great way to feel better, gain health benefits and have fun. For some people, daily fitness is a serious sacrifice that requires careful time management and dedication. But when you make your health a priority, the benefits are truly worth the time and effort you spend on it.