Becky de Champlain “Colon cancer is often silent and insidious – I can attest to that. At only 30 years of age and with virtually no symptoms or family history I was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer. I owe a debt of gratitude to my family doctor who by accident (or perhaps divine intervention) ticked a box for a lab test on some routine bloodwork that came back suspicious for colon cancer. She, as well as several specialists, tried to reassure me that it was very unlikely that at my age I could have such a disease. But my insistence on having further testing was justified when a tumour was detected in my colon during a colonoscopy.

A whirlwind of more tests and doctor appointments followed. Despite metastases (tumours which spread outside the colon) being detected in my liver and lymph nodes, my doctors were confident that with surgery and chemotherapy I would have a good chance of overcoming this disease. And so it began. In February 2010 I had surgery to remove half my colon and two-thirds of my liver. After six weeks of recovery I started on a six-month course of chemotherapy. This proved hard on my body and very challenging on my mind and spirit. On the bright side of things, the time off of work afforded me more time to spend with my young son (who was not even two when I was diagnosed) and when I felt well we enjoyed lots of quality time at our family cottage.

Now, two years later I am doing well and despite a setback last year when another tumour was found in my liver, the outlook remains good. It will be years before I know whether I am cancer free and so I continue to live on a roller-coaster of blood tests and scans searching for any signs of return of cancer in my body. I credit the support of dear friends, family and colleagues with helping me through the tough times. I am committed to fundraising and raising awareness of colon cancer screening. I have benefitted from the support and education programs offered by the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada since becoming a member shortly after my diagnosis. I am proud to be involved for a second year with the Get Up There ski challenge which provides generous funds to cancer organizations to help continue public awareness campaigns.

I have been cancer free for over five years. I had my second baby in 2013, three years after my diagnosis, so I have two boys now. And I am completing my masters in nursing this year.

Life is full of challenges, but no challenge is insurmountable. I am looking forward once again to reaching the top of Wentworth Mountain with family and friends by my side.”