By Marc Aurèle Chay

Vaiopoulos, A.G., Athanasoula, K.C., Papavassiliou, A.G., 2014. Epigenetic modifications in colorectal cancer: Molecular insights and therapeutic challenges. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease 1842, 971–980. doi:10.1016/j.bbadis.2014.02.006

Vaiopoulos, A.G., Athanasoula, K.C., Papavassiliou, A.G., 2014. Epigenetic modifications in colorectal cancer: Molecular insights and therapeutic challenges. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Molecular Basis of Disease 1842, 971–980. doi:10.1016/j.bbadis.2014.02.006

Consider the genome as words in a book, and epigenetics as the punctuation and accents that dictate the way each sentence is read. Epigenetic regulation refers to the heritable and reversible mechanisms that alter gene expression without affecting the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms, among others, include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, chromatin remodelers and histone post-translational modifications. They play a crucial role in the proper functioning of a cell. In cancer, genetic and epigenetic alterations are linked together and can both contribute to the activation of oncogenes and/or the silencing of tumor suppressors. In colorectal cancer (CRC), understanding the epigenetic mechanisms driving pathogenesis have been a focus of the scientific community since the early 2000s. Many potential driver aberrations have been found, but as with genetic mutations, there isn’t a single mechanism that can explain CRC development.

DNA Methylation in CRC

DNA methylation refers to the addition of a methyl group to a nucleotide, usually a cytosine in a CG context. When present at CpG islands, it correlates strongly with repression of the nearest gene. Researchers have found global genomic hypomethylation, especially in CIN CRCs, as well as hypermethylation in promoter regions of specific genes such as APC, Cadherin-1 (CDH1), runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), and RASSF1A.

Histone Modifications in CRC

Other than DNA methylation are histone post-translational modifications. These are the addition of methyl/acetyl/ubiquityl/phosphate groups to the proteins that make up nucleosomes. The modifications regulate the way DNA is compacted in the nucleus, and recruit various proteins involved in activation or repression of gene expression. In CRC, many genes encoding of proteins responsible for these histone modifications are dysregulated, thus changing the epigenomic landscape of the cell. For example, histone deacetylase 2(HDAC2) is upregulated in the early steps of CRC. HDAC1-3, 5 and 7 have also been reported to be upregulated in CRC. Dysregulation of Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), which interacts with tumor suppressor p53, seems also to increase the proliferation, invasion and metastatic potential of CRC cells.

Non-Coding RNAs in CRC

Another type of epigenetic mechanism which can modulate gene expression in CRC is the non-coding RNAs which include the micro-RNAs (miRNA), and long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNA). For example, the miR-200 family are known to be implicated in cancer invasion and migration; the hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) is correlated to advanced CRC and enhanced metastatic potential of cancer cells.

Epigenetics is still a relatively new field of research. As scientists strive to elucidate the etiology of colorectal cancer, they discover new potential mechanisms at play. Understanding the epigenetic basis of CRC may open the door for new drugs and biomarkers, so be on the lookout!







References:

Bardhan, K., Liu, K., 2013. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis. Cancers (Basel) 5, 676–713. doi:10.3390/cancers5020676

Sameer, A.S., Nissar, S., 2016. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Mol Biol Res Commun 5, 49–57.

Sazanov, A.A., Kiselyova, E.V., Zakharenko, A.A., Romanov, M.N., Zaraysky, M.I., 2016. Plasma and saliva miR-21 expression in colorectal cancer patients. J. Appl. Genet. doi:10.1007/s13353-016-0379-9

Vaiopoulos, A.G., Athanasoula, K.C., Papavassiliou, A.G., 2014. Epigenetic modifications in colorectal cancer: Molecular insights and therapeutic challenges. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Molecular Basis of Disease 1842, 971–980. doi:10.1016/j.bbadis.2014.02.006