BUM RUN FUN-DRAISING FOR A GOOD CAUSE

unnamed (1) On Sunday April 30th at 7:30 AM, at Queen’s Park Circle in Toronto, Balanse Bum Run will host its 6th annual fundraising event to benefit colorectal cancer associations across Canada (including the CCAC) in support of their fight against Canada’s second leading cancer killer.
Bums of all ages and fitness levels are invited to partake as part of a team or fly solo by lacing up to walk/run to raise awareness and education of colorectal cancer. Little Bums can register for a shorter 1 km walk/run starting at 7:40am. The Little Bums race is a free event for children under 12 years of age.

If you live in the area, please join us! There will be food, prizes, music, press, CCAC’s ever-growing popular 40-foot long by 8-foot high, pink inflatable walk-through Giant Colon, and so much more!

“BUM RUN is an awesome event. My family and I have been participating for the past 2 years and we plan to participate again this year to raise funds for the wonderful CCAC and to spread the word that colorectal cancer is preventable through screening. I don’t want anyone to go through what I went through when I was diagnosed with stage III rectal cancer. So spread the word: BUM RUN is back! Sunday, April 30th.” Marie Taurasi who is a stage III rectal cancer survivor

As the CCAC will be one of 6 charities to benefit from the proceeds raised at the event we are calling on you to assist in one of two ways:

1. Participate in the event by walking/running: You can register for the event, set up your very own fundraising page furnished by “Running Room” and then have donations pour in! Simply click here to register:

OR…

2. Support the cause by donating to one of our team members fundraising page. Here is the link to her fundraising page:

All proceeds will go to the CCAC’s patient support and educational programs. Tax receipts will be instantly generated and online donations are secure.

BUM RUN HISTORY

The Bum Run is a not for profit organization founded by Dr. Ian Bookman, a gastroenterologist in Toronto, with the goal of raising awareness about colorectal cancer screening to prevent the 95% of cancer deaths which still needlessly occur.

Its mission is to increase awareness of the commonality of colorectal cancer today and to increase participation in screening programs to prevent colorectal cancer. In doing so, each year the event selects a list of charities to support in their fundraising initiatives. The charities have been selected based on their performance record in saving lives through promoting easy access to screening and proposal of use of the funds raised.

REAL MEN, REAL BEARDS, REAL CHANGE!

REAL MEN, REAL BEARDS, REAL CHANGE!

This December thousands of men around the world banned together under one mission: to lay down their razors to grow out their best beard. No, they weren’t just slacking off on shaving for a month – instead their goal was to raise awareness and funds for the fight against colorectal cancer by participating in Decembeard. The result, a tapestry of beards ranging from peach fuzz to the kind you’d find on a stereotype lumberjack. AND $7,090 raised for the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada.

This was the CCAC’s third year participating in Decembeard and both REAL MEN and REAL WOMEN were encouraged to participate by getting sponsors to support their beard growth – for women by faking, making, or painting a beard.

Colorectal cancer is the second biggest cancer killer for men and women combined in Canada, and yet it is 90% preventable and curable if caught in its early stages. In 2014, 1 in 13 men and 1 in 16 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer. This amounts to approximately 24,400 (about 13,500 men and 10,800 women) new cases of colorectal cancer each year. That’s why awareness is so important.

The funds we raised with all those who participated and our sponsor; Big City Beards, (for every sale they made during December they donated $1 to the CCAC and advocated for the campaign) will continue to help and support people with colorectal cancer and their families, and raise awareness of the disease, its symptoms, the need for early diagnosis and promote screening in Canada.

beard“Decembeard is a great charity for the lazy man! What can be easier than stopping to shave for a month!? Aside from the constant reminders from my wife to stop twisting/scratching/combing my patchy beard it is an easy way for me to raise awareness for a disease that has affected my family immensely.

When people see me with my patchy beard they often ask what’s going on and it is a great way to start the conversation about colorectal cancer and how easily it can be prevented. I look forward to many more years of not shaving in December!” Robert Stein

About Big City Beards

Health is our main priority and we believe in strengthening our bodies, skin and hair with only the best natural and organic products available, and that’s why we brought it upon ourselves to create the healthiest, most nurturing beard care product line on the market!

We believe in challenging the industry norms by handcrafting (USDA organic certified, International Organic Certified, Vegan Certified, Kosher Certified) products that will be extremely beneficial for all of our bearded friends. They will soothe the beards of our users, with natural ingredients that have been used for hundreds of years by our forefathers, stretched across the globe. These organic and effective treatments are going to keep your skin nourished and moisturized, leaving you with the softest, healthiest beard one could ever ask for.

Together we can conquer cancer!

Together we can conquer cancer!

February 4th is World Cancer Day

World Cancer Day is an annual global event taking place every year on 4 February that unites the world’s population in the fight against cancer. Its goal is to save millions of preventable deaths each year.

On this day and throughout the month of February, the month of love, hundreds of cities and organizations around the world link together as one under the sole purpose of raising awareness and education about the disease and pressing governments to take action.

The theme for Cancer Day this year until 2018 is “We Can, I Can,” highlighting how everyone – as a collective or as individuals – can do their part to reduce the global burden of cancer.
Currently, 8.2 million people die from cancer worldwide every year, out of which, 4 million people die prematurely (aged 30 to 69 years).

World Cancer Day is the ideal opportunity to spread the word and raise the profile of cancer in people’s minds.
We encourage you to visit the World Cancer Day website and check out the local events in your area.

#WorldCancerDay #WeCanICan

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Cancer Conversations that Matter

Cancer Conversations that Matter, a Canadian Cancer Action Network (CCAN) initiative funded by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, took place at the Berkeley Field House in Toronto on Saturday, November 19, 2016.

The Canadian Cancer Action Network (CCAN) invited cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, patient groups and concerned citizens, to add their voice to an important national conversation to help further inform cancer care dialogue and cancer patient outcomes in Canada.

Frank Pitman, responsible for patient support at the CCAC, participated in this day long event. Frank is also a colorectal cancer survivor and was a caregiver for his younger sister who died of colorectal cancer when she was just 44 years old.

Cancer Conversations that Matter is a unique café style event that brought together Canadians with a cancer story, lived experience or interest in sharing their perspectives in order to offer input into Canada’s cancer strategy This one day event focused on exploring and discussing three current issues in cancer control:

Canada’s aging population: Drawing on the lived experiences of patients and family caregivers to help highlight the unique needs and unaddressed challenges experienced by Canada’s aging population.

Screening: Addressing the problems of access to screening for low income families, and identifying what can be done to improve cancer screening rates for Canadians facing financial and other barriers.

Cancer data: Exploring key emerging issues in the collection and use of cancer data in Canada; how cancer data is used to navigate or improve the cancer journey and how cancer data may be applied to advocacy practices to improve outcomes.

Launch of the Get Personal Campaign on World Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Day

Launch of the Get Personal Campaign on World Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Day

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Today is World Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Day. A day dedicated to raise awareness of the most advanced form of colorectal cancer, known as metastatic colorectal cancer; this is when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver or lungs.

Each year there are 1.4 million new cases and 694,000 deaths from colorectal cancer. Many of these deaths are caused because the disease is detected too late. Approximately 20% of people across Europe and the US are diagnosed when the cancer has spread and even more go on to develop metastatic colorectal cancer after having been diagnosed at an earlier stage. Regardless of where you live in the world, people diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer have no more than a 1 in 10 chance of surviving more than five years.

However, with timely access to effective treatment and high quality care, people with metastatic disease can see their survival chances and their quality of life dramatically improve. But for too many patients, access to treatment is dependent on whether they have adequate insurance or if their public health system has approved specific treatments, rather than what their doctors and healthcare providers believe would benefit them most.

To coincide with this important day, Bowel Cancer UK, Bowel Cancer Australia, Colon Cancer Alliance (US), Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada, and Fondation A.R.CA.D. (France), have come together to launch the global Get Personal Campaign to make real change happen for people with advanced colorectal cancer.

Get Personal aims to increase survival rates, improve quality of life and reduce variation in access to best treatment and care for people living with metastatic colorectal cancer around the world.

We are committed to:

• Eliminating variation between and within countries so that everyone, irrespective of where they live, has access to the best treatment and care.
• Putting metastatic colorectal cancer firmly on the agenda of governments, health care providers and key decision-makers.
• Campaigning for further research to address gaps in knowledge and support the development of new, innovative and effective treatments.
• Raising awareness among patients, clinicians and policy-makers of the full range of tests and treatments to be made available.

By campaigning together and learning from each other, we know we can make a difference. Colorectal cancer does not recognise borders, and neither do we
For more information on the campaign and to find out how to take part visit the Get Personal website www.getpersonal.global.

Survivor Story: One Patient Questions & Demands Change – You can too!

Survivor Story: One Patient Questions & Demands Change – You can too!

pic My name is Joan Green. I am 62 years old, married, mother of 3 and I was diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer in 2013. My disease spread to my liver and lungs which necessitated me going on chemotherapy and a targeted therapy called Avastin. I have been responding very well to this combination therapy for quite some time. My quality of life has actually been good and I have managed to lead a relatively normal lifestyle. The majority of tumours have shrunk and I am grateful to be alive especially with the support of the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada through their monthly support and information meetings which are amazing and helpful to us all. I really appreciate these monthly meetings.

I have recently been advised though by my medical oncologist that my liver enzymes are taking a beating because of the toxicity caused from the chemotherapy. The oncologist is, therefore, recommending I change chemotherapy regimen. If I do this, I will no longer be eligible for the avastin which I believe has made a difference in the management of my disease. The provincial plan where I live does not fund avastin therapy in the next line of therapy for me. This is so disappointing for me and for my family who rely entirely on universal health care coverage! I truly believe that Avastin is the drug that is keeping my cancer at bay. I am not certain how to proceed. I know that other countries fund avastin in multiple lines of therapy. Why not in Canada?

Do you want to partake in a movement for change?

action-changes-thingsIf so, the CCAC needs your help! We’ve teamed up with patient advocacy groups from around the world to improve the treatment and care of patients affected by advanced colorectal cancer. Advanced colorectal cancer or metastatic colorectal cancer is when the cancer has spread from the colon or rectum to another part of the body such as the liver or lungs, or anywhere else for that matter. We are carrying out a comprehensive survey on the experiences of advanced colorectal cancer patients to learn about excellent practice and gain an understanding of where improvements need to be made.

Act now and promote change! Take the survey here:

http://confirmit.ssisurveys.com/wix/p65578404.aspx?l=4105

Bracco/EZEM Canada BBQ

It was a festive atmosphere on July 15th at Bracco / EZEM Canada where employees launched their summer vacation with the company’s annual BBQ. In addition to thanking their employees for their accomplishments, Bracco / EZEM Canada took the opportunity to raise awareness of colorectal cancer screening. As a manufacturer of barium products and accessories dedicated to medical imaging of the gastrointestinal tract, employees were able to learn more about the use and importance of their products in these tests. Moreover, this day raised donations for the cause and a $ 1,000 cheque was handed over to the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada. Bravo!

Kent Nagano and the Montreal Symphony Orchestra

The Montreal Symphony Orchestra’s annual summer concert at the Olympic Park has become a tradition. Led my maestro Kent Nagano, it always attracts a crowd of music lovers. This year on August 10th, the MSO put together a concert to celebrate the Olympic Park’s 40th anniversary. A truly musical celebration to mark an important event and pay tribute to the athletes who competed here in 1976!

In coloboration with the Montréal East Island Integrated University Health and Social Services Center, the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada had the opportunity to greet the concert goers and inform them about colorectal cancer screening.

“Andrew’s Walk”

“Andrew’s Walk”

About Me:

Andrew I was diagnosed with stage 4 colorectal cancer in 2011 at the age of 29. Over the past 5 years, I have been through radiation therapy, countless cycles of chemotherapy and several surgeries on my colon, liver and lungs. In addition to traditional treatment, I have embraced a healthy lifestyle and am so happy to be doing well.

I have a wonderful wife and we were blessed with the arrival of our beautiful son in January of this year. I am very thankful for the on-going support of our family and friends, and the amazing team of health care professionals who have helped me to get here.

About “Andrew’s Walk to Support Cancer Patients”:

After my diagnosis, I wanted to help raise money to fight the disease and support cancer patients. We raised $26,382 over 5 years with the help of our family and friends!

“Andrew’s Walk to Support Cancer Patients” was officially launched in 2014. Each year, we select a different organization or endeavour to support. This year, we are pleased to be raising money for the support groups run by the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada (CCAC).

Why we are raising money for the CCAC:

My wife found the CCAC 6 months after my diagnosis. This organization has made a huge difference in my battle against colorectal cancer. I have attended the monthly Oakville support group meetings on many occasions over the past 5 years. These meetings, led by Filomena Servidio-Italiano, provide me with the knowledge, resources and confidence to ask the right questions, make informed decisions and better manage the treatment of my disease. The CCAC provides a positive and supportive environment where colorectal patients come together to gather information and share their unique experience in this journey. Filomena is always there to listen and provide guidance, and to advocate on behalf of colorectal cancer patients.

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I am proud to be having “Andrew’s Walk to Support Cancer Patients” on September 17th, 2016 with all of the money raised going to help the support groups at CCAC. I know first hand what a difference they can make in this battle against colorectal cancer.

To make a donation click here

4 Things You Need to Take Away From ASCO’s Annual Meeting

4 Things You Need to Take Away From ASCO’s Annual Meeting

Guest Blogger – Marc-Aurèle Chay

ASCO 2016 - image 2 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2016 annual meeting took place June 3rd to 7th in Chicago, Illinois. Being the largest cancer conference in the world, it gathered doctors, researchers and biopharma giants to discuss the latest trends in cancer research. On the topic of colorectal cancer, you will find the four most promising advances that were presented at the conference below.

Combining Nivolumab and Ipilimumab to treat MSI-H mCRC: The CheckMate-142 trial
CheckMate-142, an ongoing phase II clinical trial, is testing the efficacy of combining Nivolumab with Ipilimumab for treatment of mCRC. The two drugs are hypothesized to enhance T cell antitumor activity through complementary mechanisms, and are promising for the targeting of MSI-H (microsatellite instability high) mCRC especially. With an overall response rate (ORR) of up to 33% (9/27 MSI-H patients on combination therapy having a partial remission), this combination therapy shows good potential and appears to be tolerated by most patients, although the effects seem to be more effective for MSI-H mCRC only.

A new promising combination therapy for the treatment of KRAS-mutated, non-MSI-High CRC.
A phase Ib study is investigating the combination potential of Cobimetinib (a MEK inhibitor) and Atezolizumab (an anti-PDL1 antibody) for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Using a predefined expansion cohort of KRAS-mutated mCRC, the combination treatment achieved an ORR of 20%, with treatment related grade 3 adverse event occurring in 35% of the patients. This is a step forward in the treatment of non MSI-H mCRC, and evaluation of the combination treatment effectiveness will be continued.

More is not always better when treating CRC with chemotherapy.
STAR-01, a randomized phase III clinical trial, investigated the effects of increasing the aggressiveness of chemotherapy for the treatment of resectable locally advanced rectal cancer. They compared a standard regimen of 5FU-based chemoradiation with the same regimen + oxaliplatin. The more aggressive chemotherapy regimen did not result in improved pathological complete response or 5 year overall survival rate, but was unfortunately associated with increased toxicity.

Right-side vs left-side colorectal cancers, differences in prognosis and response to treatment.
A lot of attention was brought to the debate of the differences between left and right side colorectal cancer. A retrospective analysis of the CALGB/SWOG 80405 study showed that patients with primary tumors on the right side of the colon have a 55% higher risk for death compared with patients with primary tumors located on the left side. This finding is especially important for the designing of new drugs and drug trials, and need to be taken into account when doing randomization for studies.

And there you have it, the most promising studies presented at this year’s ASCO relating to colorectal cancer.