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March Awareness Month Comes to a Close – Words From Ministers Around the Country

March Awareness Month Comes to a Close – Words From Ministers Around the Country

As March awareness month comes to a close, we would like to reflect upon our reach and the impact these campaigns have on the lives of Canadians throughout the country. More than ever this year, the international and national community has come together to bring more awareness to colorectal cancer everywhere. We thank all of our supporters/followers for helping to spread the word and hope that you will continue to do – There is still work to be done. Continue to follow us and the social media platforms of our partners: N2Y & Foods That Fight. And continue to share, not only our content but also that of your own. Please send us private messages on any news stories that you have or survivor stories of your own. You are not alone, WE are in this fight together and will one day be able proudly say that WE BEAT THIS DISEASE TOGETHER!

INFOGRAPHIC Ministers of Health 2016 FINAL

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March Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March Awareness_FB TW BANNER (1)This March, join Canadians across the country to honor all those affected by colorectal cancer during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Last year alone, an estimated 26,100 Canadians were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. One in 12 men and one in 14 women are expected to develop colorectal cancer during their lifetime.

Despite the fact that colorectal cancer is Preventable, Treatable, and Beatable, it remains the second leading cancer killer in our nation. It does not discriminate against sex nor age. In past generations it was a disease more commonly found in individuals 50 years and over. However, statistics now show that more young people are being diagnosed, particularly those with Lynch syndrome.

Awareness, education and prevention through timely screening and healthy lifestyles are key to survival. Consequently, the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada (CCAC) programs and campaigns are designed with this goal in mind, particularly to our younger population through our Never Too Young (N2Y) campaign.

butt picOn March 3rd, you can help support the CCAC and our patients by organizing a “Dress in Blue” Day at your work place. By dressing in Blue and raising funds for important CCAC programs, you will be spreading awareness of the disease, supporting patients and their families. It’s a simple and fun way to help us help you! For more information and to register your workplace, see: http://ccac.donordrive.com/event/515.

During awareness month, we are also celebrating the success of our Foods That Fight Cancer (FTFC) program under the direction of Dr. Richard Béliveau. FTFC’s goal is to help Canadians make the right food choices that will not only help prevent cancer, but also increase the chances of survival.
By supporting the CCAC, not only are you becoming part of the fight against cancer, you are helping to develop important programs and support for patients across the country who struggle to meet the challenges of this disease. “Patients now have more options to treat this disease than ever before. New treatments may completely change the manner in which we treat this disease. I am more optimistic than ever before that we can prolong lives longer and ultimately find a cure”, said Barry D. Stein, president of the CCAC.

We need your help to get the word out to save a life! Please donate to help us help you!
Together we can make a difference!

Visit our website or follow us on social media for a full list of our upcoming March Awareness Month events.

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Foods That Fight Cancer

March Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

DIB EN March is the Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month when we strive to raise awareness about the importance of screening and offer our support to those touched by the disease. Whether you are connected to the disease as a patient, family member, caregiver, survivor, friend of someone touched by the disease, or not, this applies to you.

“This March, we want to make you aware that colorectal cancer can touch you just as easily as it did me, silently and with hardly any symptoms. It is one disease that does not discriminate and can touch anyone,” said Barry D. Stein president of the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada (“CCAC”).

Most people are unaware that the disease is Preventable, Treatable, and Beatable. Those affected know the importance of informing and educating the public on the possibilities of prevention, and of a cure when caught early.

Colorectal cancer affects everyone, young and old, male or female. Although the prevalence of the disease increases at about 50 years old, many young individuals are touched by the disease, and we make a point in offering them support.

“I was diagnosed with advanced disease when I was 40 in 1995, said Stein, when treatments were limited and information and support were next to none. I remember receiving a pat on the shoulder, sad looks and expressions of sympathy. We have come a long way since then, but I am always surprised how many people are diagnosed even younger than I was.”

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in Canada, yet it can be detected through simple screening tests. Most provinces have implemented screening programs and regularly use fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) or fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) for any person over 50 years old. Positive results are referred for a colonoscopy. Other screening options are available based on the recommendation of a physician, but don’t wait for the appearance of symptoms, by then it may already be too late.

This month, in celebration of a healthy lifestyle and primary prevention, we will be introducing a new program Foods That Fight Cancer. We have also aligned with our alliance partners all over the world to promote the Never Too Young (N2Y) campaign supporting young patients diagnosed with the disease.

Throughout the month, we will feature new articles on colorectal cancer on our Website, Facebook pages, Twitter account and other media, and of course our www.endangeredbutts.ca ads and You Tube videos will be back again so you can “bear” out the month.

A great way to participate in March awareness month is to organize a “Dress in Blue” day at your work place. Dress in Blue events encourage employees to dress in blue at work on March 4th (or any other given day in March) to spread awareness, support for patients, and raise funds for important CCAC programs so that we can continue to help you. Its simple to do. Get a poster, register online and go to work dressed in blue. For more information and to register for your workplace, see: www.dressinblue.ca

So help us help you by spreading the word and saving lives!

About colon cancer Colorectal cancer – cancer of the colon or rectum – is the second leading cause of cancer deaths overall in men and women in Canada. Though highly preventable and curable when detected early, an estimated 25,100 Canadians were diagnosed with colorectal cancer last year. One in 14 men and one in 16 women are expected to develop colorectal cancer during their lifetime. Sadly, over 9,400 men and women will die from colorectal cancer this year in Canada.

About CCAC

The Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada is the country’s leading non-profit organization dedicated to increasing awareness and educating Canadians about colorectal cancer, supporting patients and their families and advocating on their behalf. For up-to-date information on colorectal cancer call us toll-free 1.877.50.COLON (26566) to order free copies of helpful educational materials.

Website: www.colorectal-cancer.ca
Twitter link: https://twitter.com/coloncanada
Facebook pages: https://www.facebook.com/Colorectal/?fref=ts

For interviews contact: Isabella Noubani
Email: isabellan@colorectal-cancer.ca Tel: 514.875.7745 ext.223 Cell: 514.692.2385

CCAC's own Frank Pitman and Michelle Sylvestre sport blue on National Dress in Blue Day

MARCH IS COLORECTAL CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month is here and the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada (CCAC) takes great pride in announcing this year’s new campaign SAVEBUTTS.CA gauged to encourage colon cancer screening in Canada as well as support for the CCAC’s mission of colorectal cancer Awareness, Education, Support and Advocacy.

The CCAC continues to promote the introduction of population based screening programs in every province and to lead the way in encouraging individuals to get screened through various television, radio and print campaigns coupled with the use of grass roots programs spearheaded by The Giant Colon exhibits that criss-cross the country.

“New research led by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in the US has for the first time found that removing precancerous polyps may halve the risk of dying from the disease. This underscores the CCAC’s position that timely screening must be a health priority in Canada,” said Barry D. Stein president of the CCAC. To bolster their message that colon cancer is Preventable, Treatable and Beatable, the CCAC is launching a multimedia program asking the public more than ever to help support the CCAC in every way possible by spreading the message that timely screening can save lives.

CCAC's own Frank Pitman and Michelle Sylvestre sport blue on National Dress in Blue Day

The CCAC is also launching its first annual National Dress in Blue Day to bring nationwide attention to colorectal cancer and to celebrate the courage of those touched by this disease. The CCAC is asking the public to participate by wearing blue and donating to the CCAC on March 2nd, 2012 to help promote colorectal cancer awareness.

“This year in Canada, over 22,200 thousand men and women will be diagnosed with the disease and about 8,900 will die from it”, says Stein. “So there is no time like the present to start doing what you can to prevent the disease”. With that in mind here are 10 things you can do to help prevent it:

1. Go to a doctor if you have any colon cancer symptoms.
Usually, colon cancer doesn’t have any symptoms. However, in the later stages, symptoms may include thin or bloody stools, cramping, and unexplained weight loss.

2. If you’re 50 or older, get screened.
More than 90 percent of people diagnosed with colon cancer are 50 or older and the average age of diagnosis is 64. Research indicates that by age 50, one in four people has polyps. The single best way to prevent colorectal cancer is to get screened for the disease and screened regularly.

3. Eat a balanced diet.
Studies have revealed that a diet high in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats has been linked to a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Conversely, a diet high in red meat, refined foods, and unhealthy fats has been linked to an increased risk of the disease.

4. Maintain a healthy weight.
Excess body weight and obesity have been clearly linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, making it vital to maintain a healthy weight throughout life to help prevent the disease.

5. Maintain an active lifestyle.
Studies have shown that those who engage in regular, moderate exercise such as brisk walking, dancing, and skating are at a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer than those who are inactive. Exercising can reduce colon cancer risk by as much as 40 percent. Exercise also tends to reduce the incidence of other risk factors for colon cancer, like obesity and diabetes.

6. Consider genetic counselling.
People who carry genetic mutations linked to hereditary colon cancer are the most likely to develop the disease. If someone in your family has FAP or HNPCC consult your physician and ask about colorectal cancer screening.

7. Learn your family medical history.
Remember advise your physician about family members who have had polyps or colon cancer. It is also important to discuss it with your own family members as well so they are aware of the risk in the family and can be screened.

8. Talk to a doctor about your personal medical history.
As you may have guessed, discussing your own medical history is extremely important when it comes to colon cancer prevention. Don’t assume they know everything about you.

9. Don’t smoke.
Stop smoking. Smoking is significantly associated with colorectal cancer incidence. It increases your risk for two main reasons. First, inhaled or swallowed tobacco smoke transports carcinogens to the colon. Second, tobacco use appears to increase polyp size.

10. Reduce alcohol consumption.
Reduce your alcohol consumption. Regular consumption of alcohol in excess has been shown to increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Raise awareness for Colorectal Cancer

Raise awareness for Colorectal Cancer

Survivor The whole month of March is dedicated to Colorectal Cancer Awareness. The month where the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada strives to raise awareness about the importance of screening and offers support to those touched by the disease.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in Canada, yet it can be detected through simple screening tests. Colorectal cancer affects everyone, young and old, male or female. Although the prevalence of the disease increases at about 50 years old, many young individuals are touched by the disease, and the CCAC makes a point in offering them support.

The CCAC’s mission is Awareness, Education, Support and Advocacy. They continue to develop new events and programs across the country, with the goal of having a strong voice in every Canadian city.

This month, is also Nutrition month which ties in perfectly with the Foods That Fight Cancer program, a program that aims to celebrate a healthy lifestyle and primary prevention of cancer. We have also aligned with our alliance partners all over the world to promote the Never Too Young (N2Y) campaign supporting young patients diagnosed with the disease.

To beat this disease, we need the world to know how it can lower its risks through healthy lifestyles and screening.

We are in this fight together and will one day be able to proudly say that we beat this disease together!

For the Love of Awareness & Prevention

On February 14, 2017, The Giant Colon Tour visited the Jean-Coutu Pavilion at the Université de Montréal. This well attended event was held in the impressive Morris and Rosalind-Goodman atrium in partnership with students from the Department of Pharmacy. The goal of this activity was to raise awareness of colorectal cancer, discuss the benefits of screening and healthy lifestyles, and learn how to prevent the disease. With the theme “In the Heart of the Colon” in honor of St. Valentine’s Day, hundreds of students walked through the Giant Colon with great curiosity and enthusiasm. In addition, several staff members took a few minutes of their busy day to visit this impressive awareness exhibit. The students also organized a photo contest where the participants took a picture with The Giant Colon and published them on Facebook under #colongeantudem for a chance to win several prizes. The event was a real success and the CCAC is proud to have been a part of this event at this famous Montreal university.

Upcoming Giant Colon Tour Stops:

March 4th -5th: Giant Colon in the Yukon
March 16th-17th: Giant Colon Oshawa
March 24th-25th: Giant Colon Kahnawake

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month at Pharmacie Jean Coutu in St. Bruno

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month at Pharmacie Jean Coutu in St. Bruno

During the entire month of March, this busy pharmacy on Montreal’s South Shore promoted colorectal cancer awareness to all their clients and employees by erecting signage and making educational pamphlets available to them. On March 18th, an information booth was set up at the entrance of the store and clients were greeted by knowledgeable staff members and a representative of the CCAC who chatted with them about prevention and screening. A raffle was held and three recipe books titled “Preventing Cancer” by Richard Béliveau were featured as prizes.

The employees were extremely enthusiastic in the preparation for this special day which was held in honour of one of their colleagues who is undergoing treatment for colorectal cancer. They exhibited their culinary skills by preparing their special dishes and serving them at a huge buffet in the employee cafeteria. The employees donated generously for the privilege of eating such a delicious array of food.

A total of $1,305.00 was collected from all the activities and was presented to CCAC representative Frank Pitman.
Thank you to all the fabulous employees and clients who contributed to making this such a special event.

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Another Blue Day Leads to More Awareness

The Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada would like to thank the employees of Pharmascience and Pendopharm for showing their continued support for a future free of colon cancer by participating in Dress in Blue Day at their head office in Montreal on March 17th. Over 200 employees passed by our booth to learn more about colorectal cancer prevention and screening.