A story on Medical News Today suggests that many nurses and other healthcare professionals express difficulty in initiating discussions about sexuality with their patients. This finding was outlined in an abstract presented at the 36th Annual Congress of the Oncology Nursing Society by nurses from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre.

We hear about this issue often- it seems the cancer care industry has known for some time that physical intimacy can be a real concern for patients striving to maintain the best possible quality of life.

While no online guide should replace guidance from your healthcare team, these documents may be a good place to start, buy kamagra online, if you or your partner is having difficulties during treatment:

Do you have any resources to add to the list?  We’re especially interested in resources for the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) community.

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EDIT: the National LGBT Cancer Project contacted us through Twitter to alert us to several more resources:

  • The National LGBT Cancer’s Project’s own site, where they focus on LGBT cancer survivor support and advocacy with the help of oncologists, social workers, psychologists and patients
  • Malecare.org, a multilingual site that focuses on the quality-of-life of men during treatment and palliation
  • OutWithCancer.com, a social network for gay, lesbian, bi and trans men and women who have been diagnosed with cancer