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2013 Canadian Cancer statistics

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We have reviewed the Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 published by the Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada, Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries, Public Health Agency of Canada and have summarized the statistics concerning colorectal cancer. We have presented this information in a comprehensive manner and should you wish to view the publication concerning all cancer statistics, they can be found on our site at www.colorectal-cancer.ca in the Cancer Stats section under Just the Facts or at www.cancer.ca

Colorectal Cancer Stats

Incidence rates of colorectal cancer have declined steadily since 2000. Since about 2007 provincial health authorities began to initiate colorectal cancer screening programs and as of this date all provinces have either commenced or are in the process of planning and implementing population based screening programs.

Colorectal cancer is linked to several modifiable risk factors. Consequently, the CCAC is emphasizing more than ever this year the importance of primary prevention and timely screening.

The CCAC recommends daily regular physical exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight, smoking cessation, reducing alcohol consumption, a healthy diet low in red meat consumption and high in vegetables, legumes, fruit and grains. (See our Risk Factor section to see what you can do to reduce your risk of getting colorectal cancer.)

If you are between the ages of 50-74 and are of average risk, it is important that you be screened at least every two years with a fecal immunochemical test (FOBT or FIT). A colonoscopy may be appropriate in certain circumstances. It is, therefore, important to discuss your personal history with your physician.

Prevalence

There is an increasing amount of individuals surviving colorectal cancer as a result of early detection and better treatments available. Based on individuals alive in Canada as of January 1, 2009 there were approximately: 32,610 (18,129 males 14,481 females) individuals alive for 2 years that were diagnosed in 2007; 67,219 (36,860 males and 30,359 females) individuals alive for 5 years that were diagnosed in 2004; 105,194 (56,648 males and 48,546 females) individuals alive for 10 years that were diagnosed in 1999.

New Cases

In 2013, 1 in 13 men and 1 in 15 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer. This amounts to approximately 23,900 (about 13,200 men and 10,600 women) Canadian new cases of colorectal cancer.

In comparison to the total cancer figures for Canada, for men the incidence of colorectal cancer represents 13.8% of all new cancers and for women it represents 11.6 % of all new cancers.

About 25 individuals will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer under the age of 30 this year in Canada.

For individuals between the ages of 30-49 (2,370=710 males 660 females) 7% of all the cancers detected will be colorectal cancer.

For individuals between the ages of 50 to 69 (9800=5800 males 3900 females) 12% of the cancers detected will be colorectal cancer.

For individuals 70 years of age and older 16% (12,600=6,600 males 6,100 females) of the cancers detected will be colorectal cancer.

Deaths

Although there are more people being diagnosed with the disease, the actual mortality rate has been dropping by about 2% per year between 2001 and 2009. This year there will be approximately 9,200 Canadians who will die from the disease (about 5,000 men and 4,200 women).

It is the second most likely cause of death for males with a 1 in 29 chance of dying from it. It is the third most common cause of death for females with a 1 in 31 chance of dying from it.

5% of the deaths from colorectal cancer will be individuals between the ages of 15-29 (15= 10 Males and 5 Females).

9% of the deaths from colorectal cancer will be individuals between the ages of 30-49 (320=170 males 150 females).

11% of the deaths from colorectal cancer will be individuals between the ages of 50-69 (2840=1770 males 1070 females).

13% of the deaths from colorectal cancer will be individuals over 70 years of age (6,000=3100 males 2920 females).

Geographics

The incidence of colorectal cancer in Canada is highest for men and women in Newfoundland & Labrador and decreases as we go west. For women high rates are also reported in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. The lowest rate of incidence for both men and women are in British Columbia.

CANADA

23,900 (about 13,200 men and 10,600 women) estimated new colorectal cancer cases nationally and 9,200 Canadians who will die from the disease(about 5,000 men and 4,200 women).

Provincial Colorectal Cancer Statistics 2013

Alberta 2010 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (1150 men and 860 women) 700 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (400) men and 300 women).

British Columbia 2900 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (1600 men and 1300 women) 1180 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (650 men and 530 women).

Manitoba 920 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (510 men and 410 women) 340 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (180 men and 160 women).

New Brunswick 600 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (350 men and 250 women) 210 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (110 men and 100 women).

Newfoundland 530 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (310 men and 220 women) 240 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (140 men and 100 women).

Nova Scotia 880 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (480 men and 400 women) 360 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (200 men and 160 women).

Ontario 8700 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (4800 men and 3900 women) 3350 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (1850 men and 1500 women).

PEI 115 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (60 men and 55 women) 50 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (25 men and 25 women).

Quebec 6300 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (3500 men and 2800 women) 2450 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (1300 men and 1150 women).

Saskatchewan 740 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (410 men and 330 women) 270 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (150 men and 120 women). (Source: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 - Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada, Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries, Public Health Agency of Canada)

2012 Colorectal Cancer Statistics Summary

2012 Statistics Canada Findings

Trends in Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer incidence rates between 1983 and 2000 were relatively stable in men and declined slightly in females. In both sexes, the incidence rate has declined significantly (0.8% per year) since 2000. Between 2001 and 2007 for males and between 1998 and 2007 for females, overall mortality rates declined significantly. The rates declined, on average, by at least 2% per year since 2003 in males. In men and women combined, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer at 13%.

Mortality rates continue to decline in both sexes—by 2.6% per year in males since 2003 and 1.8% per year in females since 1998. Colorectal cancer has a significant impact on mortality for men and women combined, with 12% of all cancer deaths expected.

Screening for colorectal cancer can reduce both incidence (by identifying and removing precancerous polyps) and mortality. Screening has already been occurring in several provinces, which may partly account for the decline in mortality, though screening rates are low. All provinces have announced or have started implementing organized screening programs.

Canada Wide Statistics 2012

This year, an estimated 23,300 Canadians (13,000 men and 10,300 women) will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 9,200 (5,000 men and 4,200 women) will die from it.

On average, 448 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer every week and 176 will die from the disease every week.

The highest colorectal cancer incidence rates among men and women occur in Newfoundland and Labrador. For women, high rates also occur in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. The lowest rates for both sexes are in British Columbia.

Provincial Colorectal Cancer Statistics 2012

Alberta

1930 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (1100 men and 830 women) 720 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (390 men and 330 women)

British Columbia

2850 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (1600 men and 1250 women) 1150 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (630 men and 520 women)

Manitoba

870 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (490 men and 380 women) 330 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (180 men and 150 women)

New Brunswick

590 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (340 men and 250 women) 210 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (110 men and 100 women)

New Foundland

530 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (310 men and 220 women) 230 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (130 men and 100 women)

Nova Scotia

860 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (470 men and 390 women) 360 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (200 men and 160 women)

Ontario

8700 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (4800 men and 3900 women) 3450 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (1900 men and 1550 women)

PEI

115 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (60 men and 55 women) 45 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (25 men and 30 women)

Quebec

6200 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (3400 men and 2800 women) 2450 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (1300 men and 1150 women)

Saskatchewan

730 estimated new colorectal cancer cases (420 men and 310 women) 280 estimated colorectal cancer deaths (150 men and 130 women)

(Source: Canadian Cancer Statistics 2012- Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada, Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries, Public Health Agency of Canada)